“Creating notable, brilliant art does not absolve you of your faults.”

There’s a very powerful article over at Gawker written by Dee Barnes, who is responding to Dr. Dre’s public apology for physically assaulting “the women [he’s] hurt”. She concludes her article by writing:

The hypocrisy of it all is appalling. This is bigger than me, and bigger than hip-hop. This is about respect and awareness. As a result of speaking on my personal experience with violence, I have been vilified. Women survivors of violence are expected neither to be seen nor heard, and the pressure increases when it involves celebrities. No one wants to see their heroes criticized. And if they are African American, the community at large becomes suspicious of an underlying motive to tear down a successful black man. Excusing pop culture icons from scrutiny over their history of violence against women because they are elevated to “hero” status is wrong on so many levels. Creating notable, brilliant art does not absolve you of your faults. In the past, great art was enough to exalt men of their bad behavior, but in 2015 it’s no longer the case. Survivors have a right and an obligation to speak up (#NoSilenceOnDomesticViolence). We are too loud, too correct, too numerous to be ignored.

The next time some assfuck tries to defend Woody Allen or Roman Polanski because they “make great art”, I’m going to pull this out of my pocket and make them read it because WORD.

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